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"Paola Antonelli, a senior curator at the Museum of Modern Art and a friend of Ms. Popova’s, said a good curator was someone whose own taste had somehow become the taste of millions."

Maria Popova Has Some Big Ideas - NYTimes.com

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"Fly-in, fly-out curating nearly always produces superficial results; it’s a practice that goes hand in hand with the fashion for applying the word “curating” to everything that involves simply making a choice – radio playlists, hotel decor, even the food stalls in New York’s High Line Park. Making art is not the matter of a moment, and nor is making an exhibition; curating follows art"

Life brought to art - FT.com

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ethandesu:

wedding day

ethandesu:

wedding day

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"Anyone who has tested a movie in the past five years has discovered that all people want right now is happiness. They reject ambiguity or any kind of shadow side of anything. It’s just gotten worse and worse. What people want when they go to the movies has shifted a bit. I think there are a lot of reasons for it. But it’s been weird for me, because I’ve been losing a lot of arguments. Not in the practical sense, because I’ve still gotten things the way I want them, but I’ve seen instances where the argument that is presented to me about why people don’t like the film more often turns out to be true. All the things I’ve argued for because they make the film distinctive turn out to be a barrier for the audience. In that sense, the people making the argument turn out to be right. When we asked people about why they didn’t score Contagion higher, they said, “We didn’t like Jude Law. We didn’t know if he was a good guy or a bad guy,” and they felt it was the filmmaker’s fault for not making that clear to them."

Interview: Steven Soderbergh | Film Comment | Film Society of Lincoln Center

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"I would hate for us just to be some kind of pastiche,” the velvet-voiced Ms. Cracknell said last week, at home in the Oxfordshire house in England where she lives with her husband, Martin Kelly, and their two sons. “Their ’60s sensibility is there, in everything we do, but very subtly, buried, and it pops out in surprising places."

Sarah Cracknell of Saint Etienne Chooses Form Over Function - NYTimes.com

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"Much high-end ready-to-wear now seems designed for what might be called the boutique class, as in boutique hotel. It looks cool, but the quality and sensibility are not especially elevated."

Not for Everyone - NYTimes.com

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"His dashing ascot billowing, his flat cap perched just so (to hide his bald spot), the cleft-chinned Harry Hay had some impressive head shots. As a student at Stanford in the early 1930s, he had come out to his classmates as “temperamental,” code for “homosexual.” In 1934, having dropped out of Stanford and moved to Los Angeles to try a career in pictures — and having already begun to hone his identity as sensualist and agitator — he joined the Communist Party. Around 1936, he turned up at a Halloween party dressed as “the demise of fascism.” The other homosexual bons vivants were stumped: none were terribly turned on to politics, so none knew what Harry’s costume meant. These men, and others like them across America, had no core ideology, no political groups to join, no leaders. Hay changed that. In 1950, he helped create the Mattachine Society, the country’s first gay rights organization, and demanded that the people it represented “be respected for our differences, not for our sameness to heterosexuals.”"

‘Victory,’ by Linda Hirshman - NYTimes.com

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"

Only recently have I begun to appreciate the extent to which many young professional women feel under assault by women my age and older. After I gave a recent speech in New York, several women in their late 60s or early 70s came up to tell me how glad and proud they were to see me speaking as a foreign-policy expert. A couple of them went on, however, to contrast my career with the path being traveled by “younger women today.” One expressed dismay that many younger women “are just not willing to get out there and do it.” Said another, unaware of the circumstances of my recent job change: “They think they have to choose between having a career and having a family.”

A similar assumption underlies Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg’s widely publicized 2011 commencement speech at Barnard, and her earlier TED talk, in which she lamented the dismally small number of women at the top and advised young women not to “leave before you leave.” When a woman starts thinking about having children, Sandberg said, “she doesn’t raise her hand anymore … She starts leaning back.” Although couched in terms of encouragement, Sandberg’s exhortation contains more than a note of reproach. We who have made it to the top, or are striving to get there, are essentially saying to the women in the generation behind us: “What’s the matter with you?”

They have an answer that we don’t want to hear.

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Magazine - Why Women Still Can’t Have It All - The Atlantic

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"Mikitani says his push at Rakuten has broader ramifications for the country. “Japan is so pleasant. There’s no crime. The food is great. Everything is getting so cheap. You don’t need to learn another language,” he says, spreading his arms in metaphorical acknowledgement of the comfortable lifestyle the Japanese have created. “My point is: this is very pleasant long-term decline.” He draws out the last word to emphasise the point."

Lunch with the FT: Hiroshi Mikitani - FT.com

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"APICHATPONG: Feature filmmaking never brings money. So it’s automatic that I find other things in the arts, but that doesn’t mean I was forced or desperate to do such things. They are things I’m really interested in, that are stimulating changes. When working on a feature it takes two years, four years, a very long time. And you have the urge to change, to do something quickly. Making shorts are easy because they’re always so short! Yet, working on these shorts inspires me to make features. So it’s a cycle, each propelling the other."

Keep It Mysterious: A Conversation with Apichatpong Weerasethakul on Notebook | MUBI

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"On market day we permit ourselves the feeling that our neighborhood, for all its catholic mix of people and architecture, remains a place of some beauty that deserves minimal preservation and care. It’s a nice day out, is my point. Still, there’s only so long a toddler will stand around watching her grandmother greet all the many people in Willesden her grandmother knows. My daughter and I took a turn. You can’t really take a turn in the high road so we went backwards, into the library centre. Necessarily backward in time, though I didn’t—couldn’t—bore my daughter with my memories: she is still young and below nostalgia’s reach. Instead I will bore you. Studied in there, at that desk. Met a boy over there, where the phone boxes used to be. Went, with school friends, in there, to see The Piano and Schindler’s List (cinema now defunct) and afterward we went in there, for coffee (café now defunct) and had an actual argument about art, an early inkling that there might be a difference between a film with good intentions and a good film."

The North West London Blues by Zadie Smith | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books

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"Lower gaydar accuracy for men’s faces was explained by a difference in “false alarms”: participants were more likely to incorrectly categorize a straight man as gay than to incorrectly categorize a straight woman as gay. Why might “false alarm” errors be more common when judging men’s sexual orientation? We speculate that people overzealously interpret whatever facial factors lead us to classify men as gay. That is, it may be that straight men’s faces that are perceived as even slightly effeminate are incorrectly classified as gay, whereas straight women’s faces that are perceived as slightly masculine may still be seen as straight. That would be consistent with how our society applies gender norms to men: very strictly. (Decades of research has established that, at least in our culture, it is considered much more problematic for a boy to play with Barbie dolls than for a girl to play rough-and-tumble sports.)"

The Science of ‘Gaydar’ - NYTimes.com

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"Death should inform life. Other people just think they have all this time in the world, but I have never thought that. I have it written into my will that my gravestone is going to say “Fun! Fun! Fun! Death.”"

Kara Swisher discusses life, D: All Things Digital | Page 2 of 2